Politics

Congress Agrees on One Trillion Budget Plan to Avoid Shutdown

After more partisan rancor and infighting, heads of the Republican and Democrat caucuses in the House agreed on a 10-figure budget deal that would avoid a government shutdown and keep things at bay.

The problem is that it doesn’t really do much good.

First, it doesn’t fund the border wall promised by President Trump, but it DOES fund sanctuary cities, Planned Parenthood and countless other pork projects.

When both Democrats and Republicans are praising a deal, it’s usually not a good deal for the American people.

Here’s more from Breitbart…

Lawmakers on Monday unveiled a huge $1 trillion-plus spending bill that would fund most government operations through September but would deny President Donald Trump money for a border wall and rejects his proposed cuts to popular domestic programs.

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The 1,665-page bill agreed to on Sunday is the product of weeks of negotiations. It was made public in the predawn hours Monday and is tentatively scheduled for a House vote on Wednesday.

The catchall spending bill would be the first major piece of bipartisan legislation to advance during Trump’s short tenure in the White House. While losing on funding for the wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, Trump won a $15 billion down payment on his request to strengthen the military, though that too fell short of what he requested.

The measure funds the remainder of the 2017 budget year, through Sept. 30, rejecting cuts to popular domestic programs targeted by Trump such as medical research and infrastructure grants.

Successful votes later this week would also clear away any remaining threat of a government shutdown — at least until the Oct. 1 start of the 2018 budget year. Trump has submitted a partial 2018 budget promising a whopping $54 billion, 10 percent increase for the Pentagon from current levels, financed by cutting to foreign aid and other nondefense programs by an equal amount. Negotiators on the pending measure, however, rejected a smaller $18 billion package of cuts and instead slightly increased funding for domestic programs.

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